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CRA Notice of Objection: Everything You Need to Know

A Notice of Objection can be your best recourse If you believe you've been assessed incorrectly by the CRA. Filling a CRA Notice of Objection can be complex and needs to be treated with care. Its important to know everything you can about filing a Notice of Objection. Its even better to work with a tax expert.

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What is a CRA Notice of Objection?

 

A CRA Notice of Objection is a way for taxpayers to show the agency that they disagree with the determination made by the CRA. When the CRA reviews or reassesses a tax return, it sends out a Notice of Assessment or Notice of Reassessment. These notices show what the CRA believes about your tax situation. For instance, the agency may make adjustments to the numbers on your tax return and these adjustments could result in you owing more tax than you paid. If this happens, the agency will require that you may this amount, including an interest and penalty charges that may apply.

If a CRA assessment or reassessment results in you paying additional taxes, you may disagree with this statement. If you agree, you can simply pay the tax owing, but if you do not, you can choose to file a formal objection. This is done by completing a CRA Notice of Objection.

When you object to a CRA assessment or reassessment, it is in your best interest to provide the agency with as much information as possible to back up your claims. You can do this by providing slips, forms, receipts, invoices, contracts, and other documents that support the information in your objection. The more clear, straightforward, and informative that you can make your objection, the more likely it will be accepted.

Working with the team at Farber Tax Solutions gives you the best chance of your CRA Notice of Objection being successful. Our team is made up of experts that have extensive experience in communicating with the CRA, navigating the agency’s complex processes, and successfully resolving tax issues. We are legal and ex-CRA professionals that know what it takes to support, represent, and defend taxpayers in situations with the CRA.

Dealing with the Canada Revenue Agency can be tough. Not only does the agency have strict and complex processes, but it also often operates in convoluted ways. Choosing to work with professionals who not only understand the CRA but who have experience in properly handling the agency gives you the best chance of a successful objection.

We will work with you to make sure you meet all CRA deadlines and that your objection is properly explained and supported with relevant facts. The CRA needs to see detailed information in the form of documents that back up your case. If you are unable to provide this information, there is a good chance that your CRA Notice of Objection will be unsuccessful.

The team at Farber Tax Solutions will work with you to make sure that your points are backed up by facts. When you trust our team, you are working with a group of professionals who know what it takes to get it done.

Find out how Farber Tax Solutions can help you. Contact our team today. We will be more than happy to discuss your situation and help you prepare a strong and timely CRA Notice of Objection. You deserve to have your rights protected and respected.

 

How to Successfully File a CRA Notice of Objection

 

The Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) assesses tax returns shortly after the agency receives them. In addition to these assessments, the CRA is also able to send out reassessments later. Either an assessment or a reassessment could make changes to your tax situation, and you could end up in a position where the CRA says you owe more than what was listed on your initial return.

If you disagree with a Notice of Assessment or Notice of Reassessment, you are able to submit a formal objection. This is done through the CRA Notice of Objection process.

 

Notice of Objection: Your Chance to Appeal

 

Once the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) receives your income tax return, they review the return. When the initial review is complete, the agency sends a Notice of Assessment. This notice could match the numbers in the return you submitted, or it could adjust your numbers and give you a refund or balance owing. The CRA can also go back and review returns later. The agency often does this if it receives additional information about your return (such as the numbers supplied by your employer) or if it feels that there may be an issue. If the CRA decides to go back and review your return after the initial assessment has been sent out, you will receive a Notice of Reassessment. This will replace the initial assessment.

If you believe your CRA Notice of Assessment or Notice of Reassessment does not correctly reflect your tax situation, you can object by filing a CRA Notice of Objection (NOO). This is a formal objection that states that you disagree with the information in the assessment or reassessment. Filing a Notice of Objection (CRA form T400A) leads to an impartial review of your tax assessment, decision, or determination. This means that the CRA will review all information and make a decision.

When filing a CRA Notice of Objection, it is in your best interest to detail exactly where you believe mistakes were made in your assessment and to provide proof of the accurate information. You will need to clearly show the CRA where you believe the errors were made as well as details that back up your claims. The more clear and straightforward you can make your case, the better the chance of your objection being accepted. Having receipts, documents, invoices, etc. to confirm your points is almost often necessary. The CRA will need to be given the right information if you want to make a convincing argument.

Once the CRA Notice of Objection is received, and your assessment or reassessment is reviewed, the CRA will either: agree with your objection and the Notice of Assessment or Reassessment will be modified or nullified to match the accurate situation; agree with part of your objection and a new Reassessment will be sent out; or confirm the Assessment or Reassessment. If the agency decides that the Assessment or Reassessment was accurate, this means that it rejected your CRA Notice of Objection. If this happens, you are still able to dispute the situation further and file an appeal with the Tax Court of Canada.

The CRA Notice of Objection is an important tool. It provides taxpayers with an opportunity to correct errors made by the CRA and to object to official CRA rulings. However, the notice must be filed properly and on time. Much like many CRA processes, there is a strict method that must be followed, and it must be followed correctly if you wish to have the best hope of being successful. Working with trained professionals gives you your best chance of success. Contact us today to find out how we can help.

 

Filing a CRA Notice of Objection

 

The CRA has very defined processes for handling tax returns. Once you file your tax return, and the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) processes it, your Notice of Assessment (NOA) will arrive shortly. If you submitted your return online, you will likely get your NOA quite quickly. However, if you mailed in your return, you will have to wait longer – especially if you waited until it was very close to the deadline before submitting your taxes. Paper returns take longer to process, especially if the agency is busy and has received several of them. Filing early and filing online will speed up the situation, but everyone receives a Notice of Assessment at some point after their return has gone through an initial review.

Your NOA will show how much you owe in taxes (or how much of a refund you can expect to receive) as well as other information about your tax situation. If the CRA has made any changes to your situation that are different from what you stated on your tax return, these changes will be noted on the assessment.  If you disagree with the information listed, you are able to formally object. This is done by filing form T400A, which is more commonly known as a CRA Notice of Objection. You are also able to object to a CRA Notice of Reassessment, which is a document that is sent out after the CRA has taken an additional look at your return and made changes to the initial Notice of Assessment.

In fact, a CRA Notice of Objection (NOO) is designed to provide Canadian taxpayers with a chance to object to a Notice of Assessment, Reassessment, Determination, or Redetermination. Form T400A can be very useful if you believe that something is incorrect or if you missed something when you originally filed your return.

Filing a Notice of Objection is a powerful tool, as it gives you the ability to challenge something you believe was not correctly assessed. However, it is critical that you use care when you file a T400A – Notice of Objection. When you file, you will be required to back up any of claims with valid evidence. For instance, if you disagree with any of the numbers that the CRA has listed on your Notice of Assessment, you will need to provide documentation to show why you object and that your information is correct. The more evidence you have – and the more clearly you are able to outline your case – the greater chance of success you will have at filing a CRA Notice of Objection.

You will also need to make sure that you file your objection in a timely manner. This is why it’s critical that you work with an experienced tax professional who understands how to effectively communicate and negotiate with the CRA. Not only can an experienced expert help you complete your filing and speak with the CRA on your behalf, but our team can also help you prepare your case. Contact us today for more information on how we can help. We are here to make sure your rights are protected and respected and you get the results you deserve.

Thinking about objecting to a unfair CRA Assessment? Talk to a Ex-CRA tax dispute expert for free.

 

We can help  by:

 

  • 1| Offering a comprehensive solution that is focused on achieving the most favorable possible outcome for your tax issue;
  • 2| Communicating with the CRA on your behalf and navigate the entire CRA dispute process; and
  • 3| Offering a complete solution to your tax problems, including ex-CRA professionals in affiliation with tax lawyers from Farber Tax Law.

Time Limit to File a Notice of Objection

 

As mentioned, filing a Notice of Objection is a significant matter that must be treated with care. If you do not correctly outline your situation and fail to provide sufficient evidence to support your case, your NOA will not be successful and you will be required to abide by the CRA’s assessment.

The CRA has very strict processes. Since it is a very large agency that deals with millions of tax returns every year, it requires that taxpayers abide by specific rules and processes. If you do not follow these steps and processes correctly, the CRA may not be willing to listen to your objection. That means you’ll lose out on your chance to state that you disagree with the CRA and you will have to live with the view that the agency has taken. This is likely not a situation that you will want to be in. If you believe that the agency has made an error with your tax situation, it’s important that your voice is heard. This means you’ll need to do things “by the book.”

One important factor to note is that there is a time limit for filing a CRA Notice of Objection. The time limit for individuals is one year after the normal filing deadline for the return or 90 days after the day printed on your Notice of Assessment, whichever is later. For example, if you file your tax return in April 2018 and the filing deadline is April 30th, you may receive your assessment on June 30th, 2018. This means that you must file your CRA Notice of Objection by April 30th, 2019, since this date is later than 90 days from June 30th, 2018. However, if your return is filed on April 30th, 2018 and you are reassessed on March 15th, 2019, your CRA Notice of Objection will be due by June 13th, 2019.

Since there are time factors associated with filing an objection, it is important that you keep all receipts and documentation easily accessible after you file your tax return. You may need them to prove your case.

If you miss the first deadline, the CRA will allow an extension, as long as it is applied for within one year of the deadline for filing the Notice of Objection. With this application for an extension, you will need to provide the reason why you were unable to file your objection within the regular time limits, prove that you had intentions of filing all along, and show that you’ve applied a soon as was possible. If you wish to file for an extension, it is a good idea to speak with a tax expert to determine what the best course of action will be. CRA processes are very specific, so it’s important to have experts on your side. Working with our team will give you the best chance of success. Contact us today to find out how we can help. We are a team of legal experts and ex-CRA professionals who have extensive experience at successfully navigating CRA processes and resolving tax issues.

 

The T400 Notice of Objection Form

 

If you wish to object to a Notice of Assessment or Notice of Reassessment, you will need to complete the T400A Notice of Objection form. The CRA Notice of Objection form (officially CRA Form T400A) is your opportunity to formally disagree with a CRA assessment or reassessment. The CRA gets things wrong sometimes, but it is completely on the onus of the taxpayer to point out these errors and ensure that the facts are heard.

This can be done by filing a CRA Notice of Objection.

When you complete CRA Form T400A, you need to ensure that you are clear in explaining your situation. If you have a strong case and you explain yourself well, this increases the likelihood of your objection being accepted. This is why it is so important to work with an experienced professional when filing. The team at Farber Tax Solutions understands what is necessary to get the CRA to take notice and understand the taxpayer’s case. We have extensive experience in working with taxpayers to resolve tax situations, object to assessments and reassessments, appeal CRA decisions, and much more. You can trust our dedicated team to help you at any stage of the objection process.

In addition to our experience in dealing with the CRA, we also fully understand exactly how crucial it is to have evidence to support your case. Not only must you effectively explain your situation to the CRA, but you will also need to back up your facts. This means you will need to provide invoices, income statements, receipts, and other documents that show that your argument is correct.

Having the right proof can be the difference between having your CRA Notice of Objection accepted or rejected. When you work with Farber Tax Solutions, we review your situation help you prepare your case, ensuring that it is clear and concise and that you have the documentation to back up your claims.

At Farber Tax Solutions, we believe that everyone deserves to have their voice heard and a fair process in front of the CRA. For more information on how we can assist you with your CRA Notice of Objection, please feel free to contact us today.

Once the CRA receives your objection, it typically takes quite some time for the agency to review it and arrive at a decision. Often, it is many months before you know whether your objection will be accepted. During the time, the agency may contact you to clarify your statements or request additional supporting documents. During this stage, it is also important that you have experts on your side.

There could be three potential outcomes following a Notice of Objection: The CRA could agree with the objection, it could agree with the assessment or reassessment, or it could agree with some parts of the objection but not all. If you disagree with the CRA’s response to your objection, you are able to appeal the decision. The team at Farber Tax Solutions can represent you during this appeal process.

 

How to File a CRA Notice of Objection

 

As mentioned, accuracy is critical when it comes to dealing with the Canada Revenue Agency. The CRA not only expects that things be done in a certain manner and on a certain schedule, but it also requires that proof is provided for all claims. If you are planning on objecting to a CRA assessment or reassessment, your CRA Notice of Objection must contain invoices, receipts, or other valid documents to back up your claims. This is why it is a very good idea to work with trained professionals who understand CRA processes and know how to effectively communicate with the agency and prepare cases that clearly lay out the facts. If you are planning on filing a CRA Notice of Objection, you’ll want to have experts on your side that give you the best chance of success.

How do you file an objection? This can be done in two ways. If you are within the regular time limit of one year after the normal filing deadline or 90 days after the Notice of Assessment, you can formally register your dispute online. You can also submit a hard copy of a Form T400A Notice of Objection to your local tax services office.

However, you choose to file, know that this can be a complicated process.

When you file an objection, you will need to clearly outline the issue that is in dispute, why you believe it has resulted in an incorrect assessment, and you will need to provide any and all relevant documentation that supports your objection. The more you can do to show why you feel the assessment is incorrect, the better off you’ll be. Communicating with the CRA can be difficult in the best of times, and especially when you are submitting a CRA Notice of Objection. The Agency will not want to be proven wrong and will, naturally, believe that the assessment made by the CRA is correct. It’s critical that you have strong evidence to back up your claims if you want to change their minds.

Once you file a Notice of Objection with the CRA, your case will be forwarded to an Appeals Officer who will review it and make a determination. The time it takes to receive your determination is based on several factors, including the complexity of the issue and any delays caused by not submitting all the required documentation. It is in your best interest to provide all relevant documents quickly, so the process does not stretch out longer than it needs to.

The tax professionals at Farber Tax Solutions can give you the best possible outcome when you object to a Notice of Assessment. Our team is made up of ex-CRAand legal experts who have years of experience in communicating and negotiating with the Canada Revenue Agency. You can trust our team to help you prepare your case, ensure that you understand all the documentation that you will need to provide, and speak with the CRA on your behalf. The objection process can be complicated and time-consuming. It’s best to work with professionals who have a proven track record of success. Contact us today for more information.

Looking to file a CRA Notice of Objection? Talk to a Ex-CRA tax dispute expert for free.

How to Write a Notice of Objection to the CRA

 

If you are planning on filing a CRA Notice of Objection, two factors are extremely important. One is that the objection is filed on time. As mentioned, the agency has strict deadlines when it comes to objections. The standard deadline is either one year from filing deadline for your return or 90 days from the date listed on the Notice of Assessment or Reassessment, whichever date is later.

It is possible to have this deadline extended, however, but it is crucial that you apply for an extension properly. If you wish to file for an extension, you will need to explain why you are requesting an extension, prove that you had intentions of filing as soon as you could, and show that you filed your objection as soon as it was possible.This request for an extension must be received within one year of the original Notice of Objection deadline.

Having proof of all relevant details is important. When you file a CRA Notice of Objection, you’ll need to be able to back up any claims that you are making that conflict with the information listed in the Notice of Assessment or Reassessment. The CRA will not simply take your word for it, you will need to show why the information in the assessment or reassessment is incorrect. This can be done by supplying documentation that confirms your claims. This proof often comes in the form of receipts, invoices, information slips, and other such documents. Failing to provide appropriate proof will drastically decrease the chances of your CRA Notice of Objection being successful.

The team at Farber Tax Solutions can help you prepare your Notice of Objection. We will work with you to explain your tax situation in a clear and straightforward manner so that the CRA can see your side of the story. We will also make sure that you know which documents to include to back up your points, giving you the best chance of a successful objection.

If you have missed the filing deadline, we can also help you apply for an extension. It is important that this extension request be submitted in a timely manner, that you are able to properly explain why you did not file in time, and that you can prove that you did file as soon as you were able.

Farber Tax Solutions is made up of experts who have extensive experience in handling the CRA. Our legal and ex-CRA team not only understands CRA processes and how to successfully navigate them, but we also know what it takes to get results.

Handling the CRA can be very tough and it’s critical that you take care when doing so. If you have received a Notice of Assessment or Notice of Reassessment and disagree with the information provided by the CRA, trust Farber when it comes to filing your CRA Notice of Objection. Contact us today to find out how we can help. We will be more than happy to assist you and make sure that your voice and heard and respected by the CRA.

 

Where to Mail Notice of Objection CRA

 

One of the obvious aspects of the formal objection process is how to submit the T400A Notice of Objection form once it is complete. This may seem like a simple step, but it’s one where attention is important.

There are several ways to file a CRA Notice of Objection. One common way of doing so by using the CRA My Account system. If you have a profile set up on this area of the CRA website, this can be a straightforward and relatively easy way to file your objection. When you file your Notice of Objection electronically, you will need to complete the required form online and submit. There is a section on the website where you can upload your supporting documents that prove your case. Filing your form and providing your documentation online can be a faster process, but this may only be true if you already have a profile on the CRA My Account service.

You are also able to mail notice of objection to the CRA. If this is the route you choose to take, then you should download the form from the CRA’s website. Once the form is completed, it can be mailed to the CRA appeals intake centre for your area. The address is listed on the form and which intake centre you should use will depend on your postal code. Non-residents can use any intake centre.

You are also able to file an objection in person at a CRA office.

No matter how you choose to file your Notice of Objection, you will need to wait for a response. In general, this tends to take several months, but it could take even longer depending on the situation, how busy the CRA is at the time, and various other factors. During the course of the review process, you may be contacted by the CRA for further discussion of the situation. The CRA agent handling the review may request additional documentation or clarification.

This is why it is important to work with a professional when filing a CRA Notice of Objection. It is important that you handle the situation correctly, that you give the CRA the information it needs to conduct its review, and that you make a strong case for yourself. When you work with the professionals at Farber Tax Solutions, you know that you have trusted experts on your side. We have years of experience in dealing with the CRA and know exactly what the agency expects when it receives an objection. This gives you the best chance of a successful objection when you work with our team.

It’s crucial that you provide the CRA with supporting documentation that backs up the statements you made in your objection. No matter how you file (through the mail, by fax, online through the CRA’s My Account system, etc.), you will need to show the CRA that you have facts to support your claims. As mentioned, these documents can be uploaded if you are filing online, or you can include copies with your paper form when you mail it in.

It can be tough fighting A unfair CRA assessment? Talk to a Ex-CRA tax dispute expert for free about how a Notice of Objection can help.

 

We can help  by:

 

  • 1| Offering a comprehensive solution that is focused on achieving the most favorable possible outcome for your tax issue;
  • 2| Communicating with the CRA on your behalf and navigate the entire CRA dispute process; and
  • 3| Offering a complete solution to your tax problems, including ex-CRA professionals in affiliation with tax lawyers from Farber Tax Law.

What You Need To Know About A Notice of Objection

 

It is on the onus of the taxpayer to ensure that the information in their tax returns is accurate. The first step in doing this is when you file your return. Once you file, the CRA will asses the return and potentially make changes to the amounts, which could modify your tax situation. The agency may go back later and conduct a reassessment. This often happens if the agency gets new information.

If the CRA reassess a return and determines that there is a tax debt owing, it charges compound daily interest back to the date that the debt was originally due. Since the agency can go back several years to reassess returns, this interest could be considerable.

If you disagree with the assessment or reassessment, it is your responsibility to object. Sometimes the CRA makes mistakes or it interprets situations differently from taxpayers. If this happens, the CRA Notice of Objection process is available.

By filing a Notice of Objection and providing proof of your numbers, you are letting the CRA know that you disagree with their assessment or reassessment. All taxpayers are able to formally object if they believe their tax situation has been interpreted incorrectly by the CRA.

It’s also important to note that the CRA is not able to take collection action against you to collect income tax debt during the time in which you dispute your debt by filing a notice of objection or appeal. However, during the objection process, interest continues to accrue on any amount payable. If you pay the amount owing, or any part of that amount, and you will receive a refund with interest if your objection is successful.

As mentioned, the Canada Revenue Agency has strict policies that must be followed if you hope to have success in dealing with the agency. This is true for numerous situations, one of which is filing a CRA Notice of Objection. You will not only need to make sure that you file on time, but also that your objection is structured correctly and that you back up your viewpoint with relevant documents, such as invoices, receipts, and other such information.

That is why it is important to work with an experienced tax professional when objecting to CRA assessments and reassessments. The team at Farber Tax Solutions understands these processes and is incredibly familiar with CRA processes and procedures. Working with our team gives you the best chance of a successful objection.

The Farber Tax Solutions team is comprised of experienced legal and ex-CRA professionals. We have extensive experience in communicating and negotiating with the CRA. Our team can work with you any any stage of the objection or appeals process. We can help you structure your case, ensure that you have the proof needed to show the CRA, and answer any questions that the agency may have. We can even help you apply for an extension if you missed the deadline to file a CRA Notice of Objection. For more information on how we can help, please contact us today.