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CRA Notice of Assessment: Everything You Need To Know

If you have received A CRA Notice of Assessment after filing your Canadian income taxes, there are a few things you’ll want to know especially if you owe taxes to the CRA.

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What is a Notice of Assessment?

 

A CRA Notice of Assessment (“NOA”) is a document that every taxpayer receives after they submit their income taxes. It is sent when you file a tax return or a tax return is filed for you. The CRA Notice of Assessment shows the results of the agency’s assessment of your tax return. Once the agency processes you return, it sends out an NOA. In addition to other information, the CRA assessment shows the date that your return was assessed and whether you have a balance owing, a refund, or a zero balance.

It is important to review your NOA and keep a copy for your records. The Canada Revenue Agency recommends keeping all tax documents for at least six years.

There are several ways to get a copy of your CRA assessment. If you file your tax return online, your NOA will be delivered online as well. If you completed a paper copy of your return and mailed it in, you will be mailed a Notice of Assessment. Mailed assessments sometimes take quite some time to arrive, especially if you filed your taxes near the deadline when CRA officers are busier.

You can use the CRA My Account page to download and print notices that were issued after February 9, 2015. The site also contains detailed summaries of notices that were issued between 2004 and February 9, 2015. You can also use the MyCRA mobile application to view the assessment for the most recent year as well as the previous three years.

The information listed on the CRA Notice of Assessment includes your contact information, statement date information, any actions that you will need to take (such as paying a balance), a summary of your account including your current balance, an explanation of changes, your RRSP/PRPP deduction limit statement, and other important information. It may also include your Home Buyers’ Plan statement (if you participate in the Home Buyers’ Plan) and your Lifelong Learning Plan statement (if you participated in the Lifelong Learning Plan).

The Home Buyers’ Plan is a program that lets you withdraw up to $25,000 from your RRSPs to buy or build a qualifying home. If you utilized this plan, the statement will list how much you have remaining to pay and the required repayment for the next year.

The Lifelong Learning Plan lets you withdraw money from your RRSPs to pay for full-time training or education. If you participated in this plan, the statement will list the balance you have left to repay as well as the required repayment for the next year.

Read all of the information detailed in your Notice of Assessment carefully. It’s important that you make sure the information is correct. If you agree with the assessment, follow the instructions listed on the assessment (such as making a payment). If you disagree, you can file a formal objection. If you wish to object to the Notice of Assessment, contact the professionals at Farber Tax Solutions. Our team can work with you and help you resolve your tax situation.

Farber Tax Solutions can help you successfully deal with CRA problems. We utilize the experience of our tax experts to:

  • 1| Offer a comprehensive solution that is focused on achieving the most favorable possible outcome for your tax issue;
  • 2| Communicate with the CRA on your behalf and navigate the entire CRA dispute process; and
  • 3| Offer a complete solution to your tax problems, including ex-CRA professionals in affiliation with tax lawyers from Farber Tax Law.
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What Does a CRA Notice of Assessment Mean?

 

What is a Notice of Assessment? It is an annual statement that details the amount of tax you owe (or the amount of refund you will receive). A Canada Notice of Assessment also lists other details regarding your tax situation.

When you complete and file your income tax, the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) does a basic review. It then sends out a Notice of Assessment (NOA). Everyone who files their taxes will receive this notice. This document shows the result of the CRA’s initial assessment of your return and is sent to you once your return is processed. The CRA now offers a digital tax filing process for tax returns. This means that you can get your Notice of Assessment online. If you choose to receive your CRA Notice of Assessment in this manner, one will not be mailed to you. This online version is known as Express NOA.

Through this service, individuals and their authorized representatives can have the NOA delivered right in their tax software as soon as the return has been received and processed.

To use the Express NOA service if you are doing your taxes yourself, you must:

  • Be registered for the CRA’s “My Account” service
  • Be registered to receive online mail from the CRA.
  • Use Netfile-certified software to complete your returns

Taxes filed electronically are often assessed so quickly that payments sent with the return may not show up on an Express NOA. This means checking the CRA’s My Account page to confirm that your payment has been received is important.

If you completed paper copies of your taxes filed by mail, you will receive your NOA by mail as well. This can take some time. You can likely expect to receive it in about eight weeks, but it could take longer especially if it is a busy time of year (for example, if you filed your taxes right around the deadline).

No matter how you receive your CRA assessment, the NOA will contain the same information. It will provide a complete account summary. This means it will detail the results of the assessed return and show whether a refund, zero balance, or balance owing applies in your situation. It will also include a tax assessment summary, an explanation of changes and other relevant information, and details on your RRSP/PRPP deduction limit statement. The document might also contain the Home Buyers’ Plan statement and Lifelong Learning Plan statement, if applicable.

You can view your Notice of Assessment online and all Notices of Assessment and Reassessment that were issued after February 9, 2015 are available to view and print via the CRA My Account site. Detailed summaries of notices issued between 2004 and February 9, 2015 are also available to view and print.

This is important as you should keep a copy of your CRA assessment. The CRA recommends that taxpayers keep all tax records for at least six years.

If any changes are made to your original tax return (either by you or by the CRA), you will receive a Notice of Reassessment. This is similar to the Notice of Assessment except that you will find that the changes made have been highlighted. If you receive a Notice of Reassessment, it will replace your Notice of Assessment. That means you should consider the Notice of Reassessment to be the current document.

If you have received a CRA Notice of Assessment after filing your Canadian income taxes, there are a few things you’ll want to know, especially if you owe taxes to the CRA.

 

Understanding a CRA Notice of Assessment

 

What is a Notice of Assessment? It is an annual statement that details the amount of tax you owe (or the amount of refund you will receive). A Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) Notice of Assessment also lists other details regarding your tax situation.

If you have filed your tax return, you will receive a Notice of Assessment (NOA) when the  (CRA) receives and processes your tax return. As mentioned, this is an important document that contains many critical details.

The information listed on the Notice of Assessment includes:

  • Contact information
  • Statement date and tax year
  • The type of return that has been assessed
  • Any action that you may need to take (such as paying a balance)
  • Your current balance (i.e. the money you owe to the CRA, the money that is owed to you in the form of a refund, or a zero balance)

The NOA Canada Revenue Agency sends out will also include sections regarding:

  • Your account summary
  • A tax assessment summary (this will list the amounts used to generate the assessment)
  • An explanation of changes or corrections made to your tax return
  • Your RRSP/PRPP deduction limit

You may receive your CRA Notice of Assessment by mail, or through the CRA My Account website, depending on how you requested to receive it.

When you receive your NOA, review it carefully and make sure that it is accurate and does not contain any errors.

If you find an error in your NOA, you are able to submit an adjustment. This can be helpful if, for example, you realize that you claimed the wrong amount for childcare expenses.

Sometimes a taxpayer will disagree with the information detailed in the CRA Notice of Assessment. If this is the case, you can file an objection. However, there is a time limit for doing so. You have 90 days from the date listed on the NOA to file a Notice of Objection. If you miss this deadline, it is possible to have it extended, but you will need to request an extension. On your request you will need to detail why you are asking for the extension, why you were unable to file on time, and prove that you filed as soon as you possibly could.

If you haven’t filed your return, you may still receive a NOA when the CRA chooses to arbitrarily assess you and input amounts like your income on your behalf. An arbitrary assessment is a situation where the CRA does not receive a tax return from a taxpayer, so the agency estimates the amount of income earned and various other numbers to create a tax return. The agency will then send out an NOA to inform the taxpayer of how the agency sees their tax situation. This can obviously come as a surprise to the taxpayer, and the numbers used in the arbitrary assessment may not necessarily be the same ones that the taxpayer would have used.

If you disagree with the information on your NOA, no matter how it was received, contact the professionals at Farber Tax Solutions to assist you with the Notice of Objection process.

Have Questions About A CRA Notice of Assessment? Talk to a Ex-CRA tax dispute expert for free.

What Does a Notice of Assessment Look Like?

 

A Notice of Assessment is a document that is sent once the CRA reviews your tax return. It contains several sections. The top left corner contains your contact information (name and address). The top right corner provides information on the statement such as your social insurance number, the tax year that the statement has been issued for, the date issued, and the return type. The Notice of Assessment also contains information and steps that you will be required to take (if any). If you have an outstanding balance that needs to be paid, this information will be listed. There is also an account summary box that details your current balance, the date it must be paid by, and a list of payment options.

The Notice of Assessment will also contain a tax assessment summary. This shows how the CRA calculated your taxes and the amounts that were used. You should compare these numbers to the ones that you supplied on your tax return to see if any changes were made.

There is also a section titled “Explanation of changes and other important information” that will explain any corrections or changes that have been made to your return.

The Notice of Assessment will also include a RRSP/PRPP deduction limit statement. This section will list the deduction limit for your Registered Retirement Savings Plan (RRSP) and/or Pooled Retirement Pension Plan (PRPP). The deduction limit is the amount of contributions you can deduct for the next year. The statement details how the CRA calculated your deduction limit as well. The CRA will take into account the information you sent on previous returns as well as the information they have on file when calculating your deduction limit.

You will also be notified of the available RRSP/PRPP contribution room for the next year. This number is equal to the deduction limit minus any RRSP/PRPP contributions you reported in past years that you can deduct this year. If the available contribution room is shown in brackets, it is a negative amount. This means you have overcontributed and have no contribution room available for the upcoming year. You may have to pay tax on your excess contributions.

As you can see, the NOA contains quite a lot of information. It is important that you review this document and confirm that the numbers recorded by the CRA match with the numbers you submitted. If you review and then notice that you have new or additional information to provide, you can send in a change to your return. This is done by requesting a reassessment and providing details as well as supporting documents such as revised financial statements or revised schedules.

If you disagree with the assessment, you can file a formal dispute. This is done by completing a Notice of Objection within 90 days of the date noted on the Notice of Assessment. If you have decided to file a Notice of Objection, it can be a good idea to communicate with professionals. The team at Farber Tax Solutions can help you prepare your notice, ensuring that you have the required documents and proof to build a strong case. Contact us today.

 

Notice of Assessment Sample

 

The Canada Revenue Agency shows a sample Notice of Assessment on their website. This Notice of Assessment sample details all of the information that will appear in an actual NOA, along with explanations into each term and section.

There is a lot of important information in a CRA assessment. For instance, in addition to contact and statement information, a Notice of Assessment also contains details on actions you may need to take. If actions are required (such as paying an outstanding balance), you will find this information on the NOA. There is also an account summary section that provides you with your current-year balance as well as payment options (such as paying online or paying at your financial institution.)

The Notice of Assessment sample found online will also contain your tax assessment summary. This is a section of the notice that lists the main lines on your assessed or reassessed tax return. It also includes the amounts that were used to calculate the balance on your return. If anything has been changed from the numbers that you submitted to the CRA, you will find details of this information in the “Explanation of changes” section. This is where the CRA will explain in detail the changes or corrections that it made to your return. You will also find information on your RRSP/PRPP deduction limit as well as the amount of contribution room you have available.

Many people find themselves searching for a Notice of Assessment sample in order to understand the document more clearly and get an idea of what information is included. It is a good idea to be familiar with the CRA Notice of Assessment as it contains important information. Not only is the information critical, it’s also crucial to understand the process that occurs if you disagree with the Notice of Assessment.

If you disagree with the Notice of Assessment (or a Notice of Reassessment) you can file a formal Notice of Objection. This states that you formally object to the CRA assessment. You will need to supply supporting documentation to back up your claims. Once you file, the CRA Appeals division will notify you that your objection has been received and it will be reviewed by an appeals officer.

Once your objection has been reviewed, you will be told if the CRA has decided that your objection is valid and that the assessment or reassessment will be changed, or they will confirm the information stated in the assessment or reassessment.

If you do not agree with this decision, you can appeal it to the Tax Court of Canada.

Objecting to an assessment (and potentially appealing the decision to the court) is a complicated process that must be handled correctly. The CRA will expect you to have strong proof to support your claims and you case must be structured clearly and accurately to give yourself the best chance of success. If you are hoping to object to a CRA assessment, having professionals on your side can make a big difference. Contact Farber Tax Solutions today to find out how our expert team can help.

 

How to Get a Notice of Assessment

 

You do not need to do anything to have your CRA assessment generated. When the CRA receives a tax return, it reviews it and then sends out the NOA automatically.  

Your Notice of Assessment will likely be sent to you within a few weeks of submitting your return. However, if you mailed in a physical tax return close to the tax deadline, it could take considerably longer. If you mail your taxes in at the end of April (when most Canadian personal income taxes are due) the CRA will be much busier than usual and it will likely take quite some time to receive the CRA Notice of Assessment.

The most convenient way to access your NOA Canada is to download a copy of your Notice of Assessment online through the My Account section of the CRA website. Whether the situation is a lost Notice of Assessment or if you just wish to access the document for any reason, you can find your Notice of Assessment online when it is available.

However, this is only the case if you have an online account with the CRA and if you have agreed to receive communication online. The My Account section allows taxpayers to download and print their NOAs as well as Notices of Reassessment as long as they were issued after February 9, 2015. If you are looking for Notices older than that, the website also includes detailed summaries of Notices of Assessment or Reassessment issued between 2004 and February 9, 2015. You can also use the MyCRA mobile application to view Notices of Assessment and Notices of Reassessment for the current year as well as the three previous years. Only notices that were issued after February 9, 2015 are available on the mobile app.

You are also able to request an income and deductions printout from the CRA. This document will show similar information to the details listed on the Notice of Assessment or Reassessment. It summarizes your income and deductions for a certain tax year. This document can be found on the CRA My Account page or you can request to have a copy mailed to you through the CRA mobile app or by contacting the CRA by phone and making a request. Both the proof of income statement and the Notice of Assessment contain similar information and both are legal documents.

If you simply wish to find out what information is listed in an NOA, a Notice of Assessment sample is also available on the CRA website. In general, a Notice of Assessment includes your contact information, the statement date, your current balance, and any action that you need to take (such as paying a tax bill).  It also includes an explanation of changes, your RRSP/PRPP deduction limit statement, and other important information. It may also include your Home Buyers’ Plan statement and/or your Lifelong Learning Plan statement.

If you feel as though you should have received a Notice of Assessment but have not, you can contact the CRA to discuss the issue.

 

Getting Your Notice of Assessment Online

 

The easiest way to access you CRA Notice of Assessment is online. You can use the CRA MyAccount section to view and print your Notice of Assessment. The site also contains all of your Notices of Assessment that were issued later than February 9, 2015. The CRA’s mobile application also allows you to view Notices of Assessment and Reassessment for the current year and up to three prior years. It only contains notices issued later than February 9, 2015.

If you are looking for an older Notice of Assessment online, the MyAccount page also lists summaries of NOAs and reassessments that were issued between 2004 and February 9, 2015.

The CRA also makes it possible to request a proof of income statement, which includes much of the same information a Notice of Assessment. This document can be helpful if you need to prove your income to a bank, government, or a lender when you apply for a loan. It summarizes your income and deductions for a certain tax year. You can get a proof of income statement on the CRA MyAccount page or request that one be mailed to you.

CRA documents are important and should be treated as such. The agency recommends that taxpayers retain all tax documents for at least six years.

It’s also important that you review the information on your Notice of Assessment or Notice of Reassessment. If you disagree with the information listed, it is possible to file an objection. It’s a good idea to work with a professional if you are planning to object to a CRA assessment or reassessment. CRA processes are often complex and confusing, but it’s important that they be handled correctly. The expert team at Farber is made up of legal and ex-CRA professionals who understand the specifics of Canadian tax law and are experienced in successfully navigating CRA processes. We can work with you, review your situation, put together a strong case, ensure that you have the right proof to back up your claims, and then communicate with the CRA on your behalf.

It is critical that you use care when communicating with or responding to the CRA. Their negotiators are not only experienced, but they have a strong familiarity with tax law and CRA processes. Level the playing field by having Farber Tax Solutions on your side. In many cases, you will need to clearly and accurately explain your case with supporting documentation. We know what it takes to effectively communicate with the CRA, how to prove statements, and how to correctly various situations.

For more information, please do not hesitate to contact us today. We would be more than happy to speak with you and to help you resolve your tax situation. Whether you are hoping to file a Notice of Objection, appeal a CRA ruling, or have another tax problem that is difficult to handle, we are here to help. Trust Farber to work with you and resolve your situation in the most fair and favourable manner possible. Having experienced professionals on your side makes all the difference.

Worried About A CRA Notice of Assessment? Talk to a Ex-CRA tax dispute expert for free.

 

We can help  by:

 

  • 1| Offering a comprehensive solution that is focused on achieving the most favorable possible outcome for your tax issue;
  • 2| Communicating with the CRA on your behalf and navigate the entire CRA dispute process; and
  • 3| Offering a complete solution to your tax problems, including ex-CRA professionals in affiliation with tax lawyers from Farber Tax Law.

What You Need to Know About a CRA Notice of Assessment

 

The Notice of Assessment is important because it contains a lot of critical information. Perhaps most importantly, it details whether or not you owe the CRA money. If you owe tax debt, you’ll want to pay it as quickly as possible. That’s because the agency charges compound daily interest on all outstanding tax balances. This means that the longer you take to pay, the more you will be charged in interest and the more you will owe overall.

Looking at your Notice of Assessment can tell you how much you owe so you can come up with a strategy to pay your tax bill quickly.

The Notice of Assessment is also important because it lists the information that the CRA has on your income, the income tax deducted from your income, your total tax credits, and other important information. You should review these details closely and make sure that they match your own numbers. If you disagree with a CRA assessment, you are able to file an objection. This should be done while working with an experienced professional.

Dealing with the CRA can be complicated, frustrating, and time-consuming at the best of times. If you are attempting to argue that the CRA has made an error, it can be even more complicated. The professional team at Farber Tax Solutions will give you the best chance of success. Our team is made up of tax experts and ex-CRA employees who understand the system. We know how to effectively communicate with the CRA and resolve tax issues for our clients. For more information on how we can help, please do not hesitate to contact us today.

It’s also important to know that, just because you receive a CRA Notice of Assessment, this doesn’t mean that the CRA is done looking at your tax return forever. Your assessment will be sent to you after the CRA initially screens and reviews your documents. This is a basic review. You may be asked to provide additional information or documentation during this review process. Once the screening is done, you will receive your Notice of Assessment. However, the CRA can go back three years from the date on the original NOA and conduct a more detailed review on your tax return. If the CRA conducts an additional review of your return and makes changes, you will receive a Notice of Reassessment that will replace the initial assessment.

Know that, if there is a suspicion of fraud, the CRA can extend the three-year deadline and look back even further. For this reason, it’s important that you keep your CRA Notice of Assessment as well as any other applicable tax documents. These will be needed if the CRA decides to audit you and reassess your tax return. You should keep your Notice of Assessment in a safe place. You may need it if you apply for a mortgage or a loan, or if you apply for a social program that requires confirming your annual income. The CRA states that you should keep all income tax records and documents for at least six years after the end of the tax year for which they apply.

 

If You Disagree with your CRA Notice of Assessment

 

As mentioned, there are often times where taxpayers disagree with the information included in the CRA assessment. There could be many reasons why. Perhaps you and the CRA have different numbers relating to your income, or perhaps the CRA removed some deductions or tax credits that you claimed. Whatever the reason, you could potentially find yourself in a situation where you disagree with the NOA.

If you disagree with the Notice of Assessment CRA provides, you can contact the agency to discuss your issue. If it is a simple problem, speaking with the CRA may be enough to get it resolved. For instance, if certain numbers were entered incorrectly and you have proof of what the correct numbers should be, this could be an easy solution.

However, if it is a larger dispute or if you cannot settle the issue with a simple phone call, the next step would be to file a formal objection. A Notice of Objection must be filed within 90 days of the date of your Notice of Assessment. It is possible to have this deadline extended up to a year, but you must explain to the CRA why you are requesting the extension, show proof as to why you could not file by the original deadline, and demonstrate that you did file your objection as soon as possible. If you wish to apply for an extension, it is a good idea to speak with a professional such as the team at Farber Tax Solutions. Please contact us to find out more.

When you file an objection, you must explain why you disagree with the assessment and you must provide proof in the form of documents that confirm your explanation. The CRA does not believe information unless it is clear and backed up by firm proof in the form of documents, receipts, invoices, and other such information.  If the CRA agrees with your objection, it will adjust your return and send you a revised notice. If it does not agree with your objection, it will send you written notice that confirms the original Notice of Assessment CRA sent out.

If you still disagree with the CRA at this point, you can file an appeal to the Tax Court of Canada. If you decide to take this step, it is strongly encouraged that you speak with professionals before doing so. This process is often very complicated, lengthy, and daunting. Please contact us if you would like to discuss a filing a Notice of Objection or an appeal to Tax Court. Our team is made up of legal and ex-CRA professionals who understand how the tax system works. We know CRA processes and have years of experience in communicating and negotiating with the CRA to resolve tax disputes. We can talk to the CRA on your behalf, present your case clearly and accurately, and work to defend your interests and rights. You can trust the team at Farber to level the playing field and give you the best chance of success of resolving your situation with the CRA.

Have Questions About A CRA Notice of Assessment? Talk to a Ex-CRA tax dispute expert for free.

What is a “Notice of Reassessment?”

 

As mentioned, the CRA has the right to go back and reassess prior year income taxes. If this happens, you will receive a Notice of Reassessment. This will replace the Notice of Assessment that you originally received. This document is very similar to a Notice of Assessment, with the biggest difference being that it will state the reasons for the reassessment. If you agree with the information in the Notice of Reassessment, you should follow the details on it as to the next steps. For example, if you owe tax, you should work to pay this tax debt as soon as you can.

How long does it take to get a reassessment from CRA? This will depend on your situation. CRA processes are often very complex and time-consuming. Outside of the fact that the CRA can go back three years from the date on the original assessment (and potentially even further back), there is no standard timeframe for the length of the reassessment process. If you are wondering how long it takes for CRA to reassess returns, you could find yourself frustrated by the length of the process.

If you disagree with the Notice of Reassessment, you are able to formally object to it. Much like with a Notice of Assessment, you have 90 days from the date of the reassessment to file an objection. An extension could be possible, but you will be required to prove to the CRA that you had a legitimate reason for not being able to file on time and show that you did file as soon as it was possible for you.

If you intend to file a Notice of Objection, it’s recommended that you speak with a professional first. The process can be quite complicated and the CRA tends to be quite difficult to understand and to deal with. Please contact us if you are considering filing a Notice of Objection. We can help guide you through the process. Our team of professionals has a proven track record of working with taxpayers to resolve issues and solve tax problems.Working with an experienced tax expert can help you as they will know how to effectively communicate with the CRA to get your situation resolved.

If your objection does not achieve the goal you hoped it would, you can take your case to the Tax Court of Canada. At this point, you will certainly want to be working with legal representatives. The CRA will have Department of Justice lawyers to represent them, so you will want to make sure that you also have experienced representatives to explain your side and defend your rights. The team at Farber can represent you in every level of court, including the Tax Court of Canada, the Federal Court of Appeal, and even the Supreme Court of Canada. We will work with you to prepare a strong case and then present it to the court. Our knowledge of Canadian tax law and CRA processes will help give you the best chance of success. For more information, please contact Farber Tax Solutions today.

 

How Long after Notice of Assessment Do You Get Refund?

 

If you are owed a refund, it’s natural that you would like to receive it as soon as possible. After all, this is money that the CRA owes you and money that you likely have a plan for. If you’re wondering when you will receive your refund, the answer will depend on how you filed your taxes and when you filed.

In general, it takes anywhere between two and 16 weeks to receive a Notice of Assessment and a refund. These two things usually come together. If you filed your return electronically, you’ll get your NOA and refund in about two weeks. It could take about eight weeks (or more) if you filed a paper return by mail and up to 16 weeks for non-resident paper returns. You will likely receive your refund more quickly if you opted to have it deposited directly into your bank account as opposed to having a cheque mailed to you.

Also, know that the CRA does not start processing tax returns until the middle of February. This means that even if you file your returns in January, you likely will not receive your Notice of Assessment and any tax refund that you are entitled to until at least March.

You can check the status of your tax return by logging into the CRA MyAccount page. This page will also show your Notice of Assessment (when it is available), provide information on your Registered Retirement Savings Plan (RRSP) and your Tax-Free Savings Account (TFSA) such as contribution limits. The CRA MyAccount page also allows you to modify your return, manage direct deposits (such as entering or editing direct deposit information), update your contact information, and more.

You can also find out the status of your income tax return by calling the CRA. When you call, you will need to provide your Social Insurance Number (SIN), your name and address, your date of birth, and details from your account (such as information listed on a previous Notice of Assessment).

The processing of tax returns and issuing of refunds can be delayed for various reasons. These reasons include: if you changed your contact information recently, if there are errors in your return (such as misreporting expenses or income), if your return was chosen for an audit, if you have been previously penalized or reassessed, if there are significant changes year-over-year to your deduction claims, and if you have a balance owing from previous years.

Note that the CRA can also make adjustments to your refund. Even if you submit your return expecting a certain refund, the CRA can keep some or all of your refund if you have a garnishment order against you, if you owe a balance or are about to owe a balance, if you owe other government debts, or if you have outstanding GST/HST returns.

If you believe that there are issues or discrepancies between the CRA’s numbers on the Notice of Assessment and your own numbers, you can object to the NOA. Please contact Farber Tax Solutions today to find out how our expert team can help.